Top Challenges for Pharmacists When Caring for Adolescents

When treating patients of all ages, genders, and medical histories, pharmacists must consider the best practices on a case-by-case basis. However, adolescent patients often have additional clinical challenges — and even restrictions — that may be a bit harder to prepare for and address as a pharmacist. Here’s a look at some of the top challenges pharmacists face when caring for adolescent patients.

Consent and Confidentiality

Adequate training on the topics of adolescent consent and confidentiality are invaluable to pharmacists with teenage patients, as it will better inform the decision to prescribe or recommend medications. Furthermore, when treating teenage patients, it’s imperative that pharmacists are aware of ways in which the rules of confidentiality may vary among young patients and have a thorough understanding of HIPAA regulations as they pertain to adolescents in particular.

Patient Questions and Concerns

Pharmacists have an opportunity to educate adolescents on medical alternatives that can be pivotal to their health and wellness. However, when answering questions directly from teenage patients or from their parents, pharmacists must understand how to clearly communicate the risks and benefits of such options. And if a patient’s parent is potentially making it difficult for the teen to speak up or ask questions, pharmacists must know when to employ their authority and request privacy, if optional.

Prescriptions and Authority

While the degree of authority that pharmacists have with regards to prescribing medications is growing, it isn’t unlimited. Therefore, pharmacists must be aware of the prescribing restrictions they face on a state-by-state basis. Furthermore, when prescribing medications to adolescents, pharmacists must be especially aware of the necessary dosage adjustments. Considering a medication’s recommended dosage for age, weight, and other factors, pharmacists must employ their best judgement and clinical expertise when amending prescriptions for teenage patients.

Overcome Healthcare Challenges With HealthCare Support

To best prepare for the challenges that face pharmacists, partner with a healthcare recruiter at HealthCare Support. Once you join our talent network, you’ll not only have access to tools designed to help you through the job search and application process, but also ongoing contact with our recruiters. This way, you’ll always be able to get in touch with a professional who can answer your questions or guide you to the best resource for assistance. If you’re interested in joining our talent network, call us today at 888-219-6285.

 

4 Ways to Increase Productivity of Your Healthcare Team

Employee productivity is the cornerstone of a healthy healthcare facility. That’s why it’s important that your employees have adequate time to get through their daily tasks and that they make the most of every minute on the clock especially in times like now when our country is depending on our healthcare workers to care for those infected with the novel coronavirus. If your healthcare team needs a little help getting back into gear, take a look at these four ways to increase productivity.

Train Your Team on New Technology

Carving some time out to teach your healthcare team about new technology can work wonders for your facility’s productivity. For example, instead of having to print reports, spreadsheets, and schedules, your team can use a communications app that quickly streamlines the process. And if you want to learn what your employees think about the productivity of your facility, you can use such apps to distribute surveys and ask for feedback. Alongside a communications app, consider using project management software for administrative tasks or similar operations that you would like to improve. It is also important to cross-train employees as much as possible. Department efficiency is just as important as individual employee efficiency and during uncertain times like now, it is important to plan ahead with Plan B and Plan C should certain team members be unable to perform their typical roles.

Recognize Productivity with Rewards

When you want to see improvements in specific parts of your healthcare facility, incentives are a smart and effective tool to use. Of course, bonuses and other monetary rewards are a great way to encourage your healthcare team to step it up. But they aren’t the only way. If you don’t have quite enough room in your budget to offer up monthly, quarterly, or yearly bonuses to the most productive employees, consider recognizing them with other rewards, including:

  • Small gift cards for popular retailers like Amazon or Walmart
  • Employee of the Month awards & photo recognition
  • Shout outs on your facility’s social media pages and intranet
  • Gift baskets or goodie bags

Improve Your Employee Evaluations

If data is telling you that productivity is low, it might be because your employees aren’t aware of what they need to improve. By setting expectations through performance reviews and scheduled evaluations, you can encourage your staff to work harder, meet their goals, and have an impressive performance history. Furthermore, you can use employee evaluations to let your staff know when they aren’t meeting goals and redirect their attention with tips and tricks to do so.

Get Help from a Healthcare Recruiter

Having a productive healthcare facility requires effort from an employer just as much as the employees. That’s why it’s essential to not only do your part and equip your staff with the tools for success, but also ensure that your workforce is filled with the best. If you want to improve productivity on your healthcare team, put together the best group of workers with the recruiters at HealthCare Support. Our healthcare recruiter team will search for the right candidates, screen them until we find the best fits for your facility, and track their progress with our scorecard rating practice. To learn more, call us today at 888-219-6285.

4 Ways to Avoid Burnout as a Healthcare Professional

Burnout can happen to employees in any field, but it’s increasingly common among the hardworking professionals in the healthcare industry. If you feel burnout approaching or want to do your best to avoid it at all costs, take a look at these four tips.

  1. Listen to Your Mind and Body

Suppressing your symptoms of burnout isn’t the right way to manage them. That’s why it’s important to not only be aware of burnout, but to also identify it as early as possible. From there, you can start to question the root cause and come up with potential solutions. Some of the most common symptoms of burnout include:

  • Low motivation — Motivation is critical in the healthcare industry. If you are struggling to focus or are feeling little motivation to excel in your position, you might be dealing with burnout.
  • Excess fatigue — If you feel mentally and physically exhausted at work despite how much sleep you’re getting, burnout might be the cause.
  • Negative attitude — Burnout can easily affect your attitude toward your job and your industry, making you question the outlook of your career.
  • Detachment — Even the most social employees can feel disengaged and start to detach themselves after feeling bouts of burnout.
  1. Focus on Self-Care

Making the most of your time at home can improve your performance and attitude toward your time at work. To prevent burnout from blowing out of proportion, spend your days off doing what you love most. Taking time to revisit your old hobbies or find brand-new ones will help you de-stress and better separate your personal and professional life. If it helps you to have a future activity to look forward to, consider booking activities like a spa day or personal training session, in advance.

  1. Use Your Vacation Time

Taking a break from your job can help you refocus, refresh, and regain the momentum you had when you first started. And you don’t have to invest in an international adventure to get the vacation you need. Simply stepping away from your duties for an extended weekend or weeklong getaway can work wonders for fatigue and low motivation. If your vacation isn’t enough to stunt your symptoms, however, it might be the right time to start looking for a change in workplaces.

  1. Look for a New Opportunity

If you feel undervalued, overworked, or out of love with your current job, consider looking for a new opportunity — and partner with a healthcare recruiter that can help you find the right one. Here at HealthCare Support, our team of healthcare recruiters will use your personal and professional information to uncover the most relevant positions available.

From there, we’ll equip you with the tools to nail the interview and negotiation process. And with quality assurance calls and consistent contact, we’ll stay connected for continual career support. To get started and join our talent network, call us today at 888-219-6285.

Soft Skills to Look for When Hiring at Your Healthcare Facility

Out of the many qualities that make a great healthcare candidate — quality education, relevant experience, and strong letters of recommendation — soft skills are perhaps the most overlooked. While these can’t be measured, graded, or certified like other skills, soft skills are essential indicators of how well a candidate will fit in your facility and excel in their position.

Whether you have some current open positions to fill or are looking for ways to improve the operations of your facility in the future, these are the soft skills to look for in potential employees.

What Are Soft Skills?

Hard skills are the trained techniques and knowledge that candidates accumulate over the course of their schooling, internships, and entry-level jobs. Soft skills, however, are the personal characteristics that candidates can also apply to their job, including professionalism, critical thinking, and creativity. While hard skills are specific to the individual duties of each professional, soft skills are useful to employees in any position, and they help to determine the way that an applicant will interact with members, patients, and associates of your facility.

Which Soft Skills to Look for in Applicants

You need to know that the next person you hire can perform, but you also need to know that they can successfully collaborate with your other employees, adapt to the ever-changing needs of your patients, and manage their time accordingly. Therefore, the top soft skills to look for when screening candidates include:

  • Communication — Whether it’s with a patient, third-party provider, or member of the same department, your employees must always clearly and professionally communicate.
  • Adaptability — Every patient, treatment plan, and medical claim are different from the last, which is why healthcare professionals must be able to adapt as needed.
  • Patience — Hiccups and holdups happen all the time in healthcare, which is why your future employees must be patient enough to provide excellent service at all times.
  • Time management — In the healthcare industry, workloads change on a daily basis. Therefore, it’s imperative that your staff can prioritize their daily and weekly tasks accordingly.
  • Teamwork — Being able to effectively collaborate within and outside of their own department is critical to the success of any healthcare employee.

Where to Find the Right Candidates for the Job

If you want to find candidates with not only the right soft skills, but also the right experience, education, and technical expertise for the job, partner with HealthCare Support. Our team of healthcare recruiters will find top talent for your open positions based on a range of factors. We’ll also use personalized skills assessment testing, screen each candidate with a multi-level system, and measure their performance with quality assurance calls. When you’re ready track down the best talent, call us today at 888-219-6285.

5 Tips to Help Nurses Prepare for the Night-shift

There are plenty of registered nurses that prefer to work the night-shift, but not all nurses are night owls. Fortunately, any nurse can adjust to a new clock-in time with a few hidden tricks and the right sleep training. To help you make the switch, here are some of the top transitional changes to make ahead of schedule.

Put Stock in Shift Changes

Because you won’t be able to communicate as much with your sleeping patients, you’ll need to rely on the previous shift for essential updates. Knowing even the most minor updates on your patients will encourage you to keep an eye out for subtle changes and prevent critical situations.

Pick the Right Pick-Me-Ups

Energy drinks and premade performance beverages might seem like a convenient choice for the night-shift, but these unhealthy options aren’t good for the long term. Instead of picking up a sugary supplement, reach for healthier forms of energy found in caffeinated teas or a coffee drink you can stir up yourself. If you have an aversion to caffeine, you can still boost your energy by prioritizing activity during your shift or trying an LED light therapy lamp to stimulate your brain.

Stay Hydrated and Satiated

Hydration is essential for day- and night-shift nurses — especially when consuming caffeine. If you have trouble remembering to run to the water fountain, bring your own reusable bottle to keep at your station. While paying attention to your water intake, pay attention to your food intake as well, because choosing the right food options can play a huge part in your night on the clock. You can make healthy eating just as convenient as the vending machine by meal prepping at the beginning of each week.

Set Aside Enough Sleep Time

While adjusting to the night-shift, you’ll need to rearrange your sleeping habits so you can get seven to nine hours of sleep in before the start of your shift. It might be tempting to try and reset your rhythm by pulling an all-nighter beforehand, but this can end up making it harder to get your sleep on track in the long term. Instead, try modifying your environment to be as sleep-friendly as possible by:

  • reminding your family that your sleep is important
  • setting up thick curtains to keep light out
  • wearing an eye mask or ear plugs
  • avoiding caffeine before bed
  • limiting phone and other screen usage before bed

Work With a Healthcare Recruiter

No matter how new you are to nursing, the right healthcare recruiter can help you find a position that fits your wants and needs. In fact, the team of healthcare recruiters at HealthCare Support will help you find the perfect fit for and lend you all the guidance needed to navigate your new role as a night-shift nurse. To join our talent network and take the next steps in your healthcare career, call us today at 888-219-6285.

What to Wear to a Nursing Interview

You’ve probably heard all the generic tips for a successful interview: come prepared, sit up straight, and dress the part. But for nurses, dressing the part can make it harder to actually get the part. So should you show up ready to scrub in, or should you arrive in something completely different than your normal workwear? Here’s your head-to-toe guide on putting together an appropriate nursing interview outfit.

The Hair

Your interview hairstyle is probably the sole part of your attire that should mirror your work presentation. Just like you would on the clock, keep your hair tucked and out of your face. Trim, groom, and appropriately style facial hair, if necessary. If you have medium to long hair, consider tying it back in a sleek bun or tame up do. However, if your hair is short, you can easily get away with a clean brush and a bit of styling product.

The Outfit

Picking the right outfit for a nursing interview is critical — but not difficult. Turn to neutral tones, and make sure your outfit is clean, pressed, and presentable. Women should wear a mid-length skirt or slacks with a blazer, while men should lean towards a suit and tie. Regardless of which outfit you go with, shop ahead of time so you select the perfect size, length, and fit that isn’t too tight or baggy.

The Accessories

To show personality while staying professional, nurses sometimes wear colorful scrubs with fun prints and patterns. During your interview, however, you’ll want to accessorize for functionality rather than flair. If you want to wear jewelry, stick with plain options like stud earrings and a classy watch. And if you prefer to wear cosmetics, lean towards a neutral, minimalistic makeup look.

The Shoes

Shoes can make or break an outfit, but the interview room isn’t the place to start setting trends. Instead of opting for stilettos or boots, polish your look off with a pair of cap toe shoes, flats, or modest heels. As always, pay attention to matching your shoes with the rest of your outfit, including the belt, and tucking or neatly tying your laces.

Land an Interview With HSS

Picking the right outfit isn’t the only way to prepare for a nursing interview. To get insider tips on perfecting your resume and delivering a killer elevator pitch, join the talent network and start your job hunt on the right foot with HealthCare Support. Our healthcare recruiters match each candidate with relevant positions and equip them with the tools and knowledge to confidently tackle applications, interviews, and performance reviews. For more information, call us today at 888-219-6285.

Tips for Floating to Another Unit

From the patients to the treatments to the actual unit, nearly every part of your job as a registered nurse can change on a daily basis. Shifting constantly can be intimidating as a newcomer to nursing but having some professional tools and techniques can make any transition easier to face. To prepare for your first day floating or to minimize your overall anxiety about switching units, keep the following tips in mind.

Start Your Shift Right  

Some units can seem more intimidating than others, but the staff on each floor undoubtedly appreciate a warm introduction. Introduce yourself to the other nurses on duty, let them know if you’re feeling a little nervous or are new to floating, and offer yourself to be of assistance. A simple conversation like this can make you feel immediately more comfortable in any unit and help you to make connections that will boost your confidence when needing to ask for extra guidance.

Likewise, you must make a point to meet with your resource nurse or the unit charge nurse to ask any questions you have about your daily tasks and understand if they have any beneficial information to give out. Once you’ve made your introductions, get ready to officially gear up for the rest of your shift.

Become Familiar with the Area

Floating to a new unit is intimidating largely because the surroundings are a bit different than what you normally work in. So, once you get to know your fellow nurses, get to know your unit. Whether you can receive a guided tour from someone on staff or have to personally make it your mission to scan the hall yourself, track and memorize locations of key areas. Know these areas ahead of time so you won’t have to struggle to find or guide visitors to them during the busier hours of your shift.

Make the Most of Your Day

Regardless of how intimidating a unit might seem, you are prepared to handle whatever the day throws your way. View the opportunity in another unit as a chance to learn, grow, and gain new skills. Let your education and on-the-job experience guide your decisions and maximize your time on the clock. If you have any questions or concerns, approach the other nurses in your hall and kindly request a helping hand. Since you’ve already made the right introduction, they’ll have no problem understanding your situation and offering their assistance.

End Your Shift with a Smile

To end your day on a high note, give thanks to the nurses and other employees who lent their support. If you end up floating to the unit again in the future, you’ll already have rapport with the stationed staff members. Talk with the charge nurse to gain feedback on your performance and learn what you can do to enhance your time in their unit in the future. When it comes to floating to another unit, practice really can make your experience perfect.

Industry Tips from Healthcare Recruiters

If floating to another unit isn’t the only thing that intimidates you about being a registered nurse, contact the healthcare recruiters at HealthCare Support. Our team will equip you with the tools to feel confident in each shift. And, we’ll provide you with expert industry advice to guide you to the healthcare facility that fits your professional style. To receive more information on our services or join our healthcare talent network, call us today at 888-219-6285.

8 Survival Tips for New Registered Nurses

Despite how much effort modern nursing programs put into their curriculum, switching from student to working professional can throw any graduate a few curveballs. If you’re eager to get started on your clinical career as a registered nurse, here are eight survival tips to help you land swiftly on your feet.

Ask Questions

Even if you graduated at the top of your class, there’s still much more to learn on the job. And because there’s no guesswork in nursing, you should never be afraid to ask questions. Asking questions helps you to avoid mistakes, learn with little to no error, and get more comfortable with your professional peers. You can find a go-to mentor for your deeper career questions, and turn to coworkers for everyday inquiries.

Improve Your Diet

Stay sharp with the right foods. Yes, candy bars and other processed foods are easily accessible and often more tempting during overtime hours. However, eating the wrong food can be just as bad as eating no food at all. Whether you have to take bites between tasks or bring healthy, on-the-go snacks that you can stash in your scrubs, remember that quality matters just as much as quantity.

Be Honest

As a nurse, you should try to only guarantee what you can to your patients. For example, instead of saying that you’ll return to check on a patient in five minutes, comfort a patient by letting him or her know that you’ll be back as soon as possible. Even if you have the intention of returning in five minutes, as promised, there are countless incidents that could pop up and prevent you from keeping your word.

Get More Hours

A lack of rest can hinder productivity, impair focus, and increase the likelihood of making a mistake. Therefore, both new and veteran nurses can benefit from getting adequate sleep. Because, even if you focus on a high-quality diet, your mind can’t function at full capacity without resting for a full seven to nine hours.

Arrive on Time

Tardiness is totally unacceptable in healthcare. With so many patients in need of critical care, every minute matters to both your patients and your peers. And, because every other RN is also focusing on their health, wellness, and productivity, your tardiness can put some wear and tear on their job satisfaction and team contribution.

Take Notes

If you’re making an important phone call to a doctor or other staff member, don’t try to remember all the details on your own—that includes the key points you may need to bring up or the essential information you may need to receive. Whenever you’re making or taking a call, try to have a writing utensil and pad so you can take notes or prewrite important points that you need to discuss.

Invest in Footwear

As a nurse, you’ll be on your feet more than not, which means it’s essential to invest in the right footwear. The wrong footwear won’t just hurt your feet; lower back pain, knee pain, and even shoulder pain can all stem from the wrong shoes. If you’re able to, invest in a durable pair of shoes with serious support and a great fit. Or, consider purchasing orthopedic inserts and compression socks that can improve the function and feel of your current pair.

Know Yourself

The best way to survive a career in nursing is to find the facility that fits. For example, if you thrive in a fast-paced environment with a lot of variety, a hospital can provide you with constant engagement. However, if you prefer a lower patient load and more structure in each shift, you might enjoy working in a smaller healthcare setting, like a clinic or doctor’s office.

Find the Right Recruiter

To find your healthcare match based on lifestyle, personality, location, and company culture, partner with the healthcare recruiters at HealthCare Support. Our team of career professionals will evaluate your personal and professional preferences to match you with fitting positions. To join our talent network and have instant access to relevant job openings, interview preparation, and resume building tips, call us today at 888-219-6285.

 

Myths About Pharmacy Careers Debunked

Plenty of people have misconceptions about what goes on in the world of pharmacy. But if you’re thinking about pursuing a career in the field, even a few wrong ideas can make you second-guess your next move. To help recent grads get started on their careers, let’s get the facts straight about what it actually looks like to work in pharmacy.

Myth #1: Pharmacists need bachelor’s degrees

A career in pharmacy undoubtedly requires years of higher education; however, a bachelor’s degree isn’t a necessary prerequisite for pharmacy school. Of course, more education will look better on a pharmacy school application, but many students enroll in a pharmacy program with just two to three years of undergraduate education.

Myth #2: Pharmacists can’t specialize  

Because pharmacists earn a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) rather than a Doctor of Medicine (MD), many people assume that they’re already in a specialized field. However, pharmacists can specialize their field of practice from a choice of multiple areas, such as:

  • Cardiology
  • Geriatrics
  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics

Myth #3: Pharmacists never interact with patients    

Pharmacists aren’t entirely the behind-the-scenes professionals that many believe them to be. In fact, if patients have a question about their prescription or just need a recommendation for an over-the-counter solution, they often go to pharmacists rather than make an appointment with their general practitioner.

Myth #4: Pharmacists only count pills  

Certainly, pharmacists are responsible for distributing medications and ensuring accurate dosages. However, there are a lot of other tasks that can pop up in their day to day, including:

  • Assisting in product research and clinical trials
  • Filling prescriptions and dispensing drugs
  • Training incoming pharmacists
  • Informing patients on the side effects and proper usage of their prescriptions
  • Fulfilling insurance documents
  • Verifying script and cross-referencing patient records for drug interactions
  • Advising physicians with patient prescription dosage and type

Myth #5: “Pharmacist” is the only job title you’ll see

You will also see titles such as;

  • Staff Pharmacist
  • Clinical Pharmacist (Compounding)
  • Home Infusion Pharmacist
  • Mail Order Pharmacist
  • Prior Authorization Pharmacist

Myth #6: All Pharmacists work in grocery stores

While most are aware of the in-house pharmacists at their local grocer, some are unaware of the variety of other work settings such as;

  • Mail Order Pharmacies / Pharmacy Benefit Management Companies (warehouse/call center settings)
  • Hospital
  • Long Term Care
  • Specialty Pharmacies
  • Retail stores (including independent pharmacies, supermarket chains, mass merchandisers)
  • Closed door pharmacies

Start Your Pharmacy Career Here

If you’re eager to get your foot in the door of pharmacy, talk with the healthcare recruiters at HealthCare Support. Our talented team is dedicated to placing professionals in the right position based on skills, experience, and preference. Through resume building, interview prep, and inside recruiter knowledge, we can help you find your fit in pharmacy and equip you with the tools to succeed. To learn more about our talent network and take the next steps in your career, call us today at 888-219-6285.

Carol

I have been working with Brianna M since day one.. she is so positive intelligent and very resourceful.. the interview process was great and was exceptional.. I love my new title and where I was placed.. Health Care Support is the best staffing agency to work for and when you are dealing with an amazing recruiter that’s on point and if you have any problems Brianna always went above and beyond her job..Brianna thank you so much!!