Which States Have the Biggest Need for Registered Nurses?

According to the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), the largest amount of healthcare careers in the United States are made up of nursing jobs. The country’s healthcare system relies heavily on the services and experiences of nurses, but future projections by the HRSA suggest that multiple states are likely to experience a severe nursing shortage within the next decade. Here’s a look at the supply and demand outlook for registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) until 2030. 

Is There a Shortage in Nursing? 

The HRSA’s report finds states may eventually experience a nursing shortage, while others are likely to see a surplus—if the current level of healthcare improves accordingly. However, the report states, “if current level of [healthcare] is maintained,” multiple states will have an alarming outlook of shortages. This potential shortage may be the result of a number of factors, including:

  • Health insurance coverage
  • Location 
  • Population 
  • Retirement patterns 
  • Shifting social priorities 
  • Access to healthcare 

Which States Need Nurses the Most? 

If the healthcare system continues to progress with normal growth, the job outlook for RNs is expected to elevate 12% from 2018-2028. Here’s a ranking order of the top five states with the most significant shortages of RNs or their full-time equivalents (FTEs) if the healthcare system remains the same until 2030.  

  1. California – 44,500 FTEs
  2. Texas – 15,900 FTEs
  3. New Jersey – 11,400 FTEs
  4. South Carolina – 10,400 FTEs
  5. Alaska – 5,400 FTEs

For LPNs, however, the figures are slightly less significant. The states projected to have the greatest shortages of LPNs or their FTEs by 2030 include:  

  1. Texas – 33,500 FTEs
  2. Pennsylvania – 18,700 FTEs
  3. Florida – 10,300 FTEs
  4. Georgia – 10,500 FTEs
  5. North Carolina – 10,700 FTEs

Start Your Career in Nursing 

While it might seem like landing a career in nursing will only get easier, it can still be difficult to find the right professional fit for your experience, goals, and lifestyle. If you’re an RN, LPN, or other healthcare professional looking to start or advance your career, partner with the healthcare recruiters at HealthCare Support. Weighing your personal and professional information against the open positions that best fit your wants and needs, our team will help you secure a job where you can truly excel. To join our talent network and learn more about our professional healthcare services, call us today at 888-219-6285.

What Is Medical Billing?

Just like any other working professional, doctors, nurses, and clinical staff members need compensation for their services—which makes medical billers a major asset to every healthcare facility, especially in Orlando. No procedure is the exact same, so clinical offices can’t slap a predetermined price tag on each treatment plan. Therefore, professionals in any field of medicine must submit their services for payment through the intricate medical billing system.   

The Connected World of Medical Billing 

There are three parties involved in medical billing and in healthcare reimbursement as a whole—the first, second, and third being the patient, provider, and payer, respectively. Medical billing is the thread that connects each party and ensures that the necessary ones are billed or payed. While the second party of medical billers creates and assigns the bills, or claims, the first and third parties are responsible for making payments on each service provided. 

Claims sent by medical billers to insurance companies, or third parties, include information about the patient and the service provided to the patient. For example, a colonoscopy claim would include the patient’s personal, medical, and insurance information as well as a report on the colonoscopy procedure and the reason it was recommended. 

The Day-to-Day for Medical Billers  

On a daily basis, the majority of medical billers’ time goes to creating claims. Therefore, they must be familiar with various insurance companies and their individual policies. Medical billers also have to verify and proofread each claim to remove any errors and verify that all of the information is correct and comprehensive. 

While there are many software options that can alleviate the complexity of medical billing, medical billers still need an intricate knowledge system to effectively navigate medical codes and assign the proper ones to each claim. The day-to-day duties of a medical biller include tasks such as: 

  • Filing claims with various insurance companies 
  • Tracking previously filed claims 
  • Receiving claim payments 
  • Correcting medical coding errors 
  • Updating billing information 
  • Contacting insurance companies 

Healthcare providers can use automated services or even outsource their medical billing, but medical billers remain imperative to their financial functions.

Start Your Career in Medical Billing

Here at HealthCare Support, our experienced team of healthcare recruiters understand the importance that each medical professional plays in our healthcare system. That’s why we strive to prepare every candidate to secure and succeed in the position that fits their interests, experience, and goals. If your career path is pointing toward medical billing, join our talent network today and gain access to top recruiting tactics designed for medical billers. For more information on our healthcare recruiting services, contact us today at 888-219-6285.

8 Survival Tips for New Registered Nurses

Despite how much effort modern nursing programs put into their curriculum, switching from student to working professional can throw any graduate a few curveballs. If you’re eager to get started on your clinical career as a registered nurse, here are eight survival tips to help you land swiftly on your feet.

Ask Questions

Even if you graduated at the top of your class, there’s still much more to learn on the job. And because there’s no guesswork in nursing, you should never be afraid to ask questions. Asking questions helps you to avoid mistakes, learn with little to no error, and get more comfortable with your professional peers. You can find a go-to mentor for your deeper career questions, and turn to coworkers for everyday inquiries.

Improve Your Diet

Stay sharp with the right foods. Yes, candy bars and other processed foods are easily accessible and often more tempting during overtime hours. However, eating the wrong food can be just as bad as eating no food at all. Whether you have to take bites between tasks or bring healthy, on-the-go snacks that you can stash in your scrubs, remember that quality matters just as much as quantity.

Be Honest

As a nurse, you should try to only guarantee what you can to your patients. For example, instead of saying that you’ll return to check on a patient in five minutes, comfort a patient by letting him or her know that you’ll be back as soon as possible. Even if you have the intention of returning in five minutes, as promised, there are countless incidents that could pop up and prevent you from keeping your word.

Get More Hours

A lack of rest can hinder productivity, impair focus, and increase the likelihood of making a mistake. Therefore, both new and veteran nurses can benefit from getting adequate sleep. Because, even if you focus on a high-quality diet, your mind can’t function at full capacity without resting for a full seven to nine hours.

Arrive on Time

Tardiness is totally unacceptable in healthcare. With so many patients in need of critical care, every minute matters to both your patients and your peers. And, because every other RN is also focusing on their health, wellness, and productivity, your tardiness can put some wear and tear on their job satisfaction and team contribution.

Take Notes

If you’re making an important phone call to a doctor or other staff member, don’t try to remember all the details on your own—that includes the key points you may need to bring up or the essential information you may need to receive. Whenever you’re making or taking a call, try to have a writing utensil and pad so you can take notes or prewrite important points that you need to discuss.

Invest in Footwear

As a nurse, you’ll be on your feet more than not, which means it’s essential to invest in the right footwear. The wrong footwear won’t just hurt your feet; lower back pain, knee pain, and even shoulder pain can all stem from the wrong shoes. If you’re able to, invest in a durable pair of shoes with serious support and a great fit. Or, consider purchasing orthopedic inserts and compression socks that can improve the function and feel of your current pair.

Know Yourself

The best way to survive a career in nursing is to find the facility that fits. For example, if you thrive in a fast-paced environment with a lot of variety, a hospital can provide you with constant engagement. However, if you prefer a lower patient load and more structure in each shift, you might enjoy working in a smaller healthcare setting, like a clinic or doctor’s office.

Find the Right Recruiter

To find your healthcare match based on lifestyle, personality, location, and company culture, partner with the healthcare recruiters at HealthCare Support. Our team of career professionals will evaluate your personal and professional preferences to match you with fitting positions. To join our talent network and have instant access to relevant job openings, interview preparation, and resume building tips, call us today at 888-219-6285.

 

Myths About Pharmacy Careers Debunked

Plenty of people have misconceptions about what goes on in the world of pharmacy. But if you’re thinking about pursuing a career in the field, even a few wrong ideas can make you second-guess your next move. To help recent grads get started on their careers, let’s get the facts straight about what it actually looks like to work in pharmacy.

Myth #1: Pharmacists need bachelor’s degrees

A career in pharmacy undoubtedly requires years of higher education; however, a bachelor’s degree isn’t a necessary prerequisite for pharmacy school. Of course, more education will look better on a pharmacy school application, but many students enroll in a pharmacy program with just two to three years of undergraduate education.

Myth #2: Pharmacists can’t specialize  

Because pharmacists earn a Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) rather than a Doctor of Medicine (MD), many people assume that they’re already in a specialized field. However, pharmacists can specialize their field of practice from a choice of multiple areas, such as:

  • Cardiology
  • Geriatrics
  • Oncology
  • Pediatrics

Myth #3: Pharmacists never interact with patients    

Pharmacists aren’t entirely the behind-the-scenes professionals that many believe them to be. In fact, if patients have a question about their prescription or just need a recommendation for an over-the-counter solution, they often go to pharmacists rather than make an appointment with their general practitioner.

Myth #4: Pharmacists only count pills  

Certainly, pharmacists are responsible for distributing medications and ensuring accurate dosages. However, there are a lot of other tasks that can pop up in their day to day, including:

  • Assisting in product research and clinical trials
  • Filling prescriptions and dispensing drugs
  • Training incoming pharmacists
  • Informing patients on the side effects and proper usage of their prescriptions
  • Fulfilling insurance documents
  • Verifying script and cross-referencing patient records for drug interactions
  • Advising physicians with patient prescription dosage and type

Myth #5: “Pharmacist” is the only job title you’ll see

You will also see titles such as;

  • Staff Pharmacist
  • Clinical Pharmacist (Compounding)
  • Home Infusion Pharmacist
  • Mail Order Pharmacist
  • Prior Authorization Pharmacist

Myth #6: All Pharmacists work in grocery stores

While most are aware of the in-house pharmacists at their local grocer, some are unaware of the variety of other work settings such as;

  • Mail Order Pharmacies / Pharmacy Benefit Management Companies (warehouse/call center settings)
  • Hospital
  • Long Term Care
  • Specialty Pharmacies
  • Retail stores (including independent pharmacies, supermarket chains, mass merchandisers)
  • Closed door pharmacies

Start Your Pharmacy Career Here

If you’re eager to get your foot in the door of pharmacy, talk with the healthcare recruiters at HealthCare Support. Our talented team is dedicated to placing professionals in the right position based on skills, experience, and preference. Through resume building, interview prep, and inside recruiter knowledge, we can help you find your fit in pharmacy and equip you with the tools to succeed. To learn more about our talent network and take the next steps in your career, call us today at 888-219-6285.

Things to Know About Being a Medical Office Assistant

The dynamic role of a medical office assistant requires equal parts customer service and clinical administration. However, even those with a keen eye for detail and a charming disposition still have a lot to learn if they want to secure a career in this rewarding role.

Where can I work as a medical office assistant?

Medical office assistants are vital to every healthcare facility, but their role varies from center to center. In larger facilities, like hospitals, medical office assistants usually work in more specialized positions. Focusing on one particular task, like billing or insurance utilization, allows them to effectively manage the higher patient workload and maintain effective customer service.

In centers with more specialized modes of care, medical office assistants must be more adept to multitask and sometimes take on roles outside of their normal scope. Because smaller facilities, like clinics, have less traffic, fewer patients, and lower workloads, medical office assistants often fill their days with a wide variety of tasks.

What are the job duties of a medical office assistant?

The responsibilities of a medical office assistant are rarely black and white. Overlapping duties include:

  • Answering, returning, and transferring phone calls
  • Greeting incoming patients
  • Scheduling patient appointments
  • Organizing, processing, and uploading patient documents
  • Handling and processing patient payments and insurance forms
  • Maintaining a clean and professional reception area
  • Overseeing facility emails and digital communication

Regardless of what kind of facility a medical office assistant works in, they must have respectable phone etiquette and strong customer service skills. They must also be extremely organized and experienced with managing their own schedule.

How do I become a medical office assistant?  

Beyond a high school diploma, GED, or equivalent experience, most employers prefer candidates to have a medical administrative assistant certificate along with one to two years of experience in a similar role. However, even candidates with no prior professional experience can succeed in a medical office assistant position with the help of a healthcare recruiter.

If you’re convinced that the role of medical office assistant is right for you, join the professional network at HealthCare Support. Our team of healthcare recruiters can guide you to the right facility for your schedule, location, and lifestyle. And, we can equip you with the tools to ace any interview and even negotiate a stronger compensation package for the start of your new career. To join our talent network and get ahead of the competition, call us today at 888-219-6285.

The Ins and Outs of Being a Medical Office Assistant

The dynamic role of a medical office assistant requires equal parts customer service and clinical administration. However, even those with a keen eye for detail and a charming disposition still have a lot to learn if they want to secure a career in this rewarding role.

Where can I work as a medical office assistant?

Medical office assistants are vital to every healthcare facility, but their role varies from center to center. In larger facilities, like hospitals, medical office assistants usually work in more specialized positions. Focusing on one particular task, like billing or insurance utilization, allows them to effectively manage the higher patient workload and maintain effective customer service.

In centers with more specialized modes of care, medical office assistants must be more adept to multitask and sometimes take on roles outside of their normal scope. Because smaller facilities, like clinics, have less traffic, fewer patients, and lower workloads, medical office assistants often fill their days with a wide variety of tasks.

What are the job duties of a medical office assistant?

The responsibilities of a medical office assistant are rarely black and white. Overlapping duties include:

  • Answering, returning, and transferring phone calls
  • Greeting incoming patients
  • Scheduling patient appointments
  • Organizing, processing, and uploading patient documents
  • Handling and processing patient payments and insurance forms
  • Maintaining a clean and professional reception area
  • Overseeing facility emails and digital communication

Regardless of what kind of facility a medical office assistant works in, they must have respectable phone etiquette and strong customer service skills. They must also be extremely organized and experienced with managing their own schedule.

How do I become a medical office assistant?  

Beyond a high school diploma, GED, or equivalent experience, most employers prefer candidates to have a medical administrative assistant certificate along with one to two years of experience in a similar role. However, even candidates with no prior professional experience can succeed in a medical office assistant position with the help of a healthcare recruiter.

If you’re convinced that the role of medical office assistant is right for you, join the professional network at HealthCare Support. Our team of healthcare recruiters can guide you to the right facility for your schedule, location, and lifestyle. And, we can equip you with the tools to ace any interview and even negotiate a stronger compensation package for the start of your new career. To join our talent network and get ahead of the competition, call us today at 888-219-6285.

How to Network in Pharmacy

Networking isn’t exclusive to potential job candidates; it’s something professionals must continuously practice in their career. Whether you’re new to the world of networking or want to fine-tune your communication skills, here’s our guide to cultivating the right connections.

Places to Network as a Pharmacist

Even if you know how to network, you might not know exactly where to start. Here are some of the best places to go to when you want to grow your list of professional contacts.

  • Charitable organizations – You don’t have to be a student to rack up some community service hours. Volunteering in your field is a great way to offer your skills to a respectable organization and add some like-minded individuals to your network.
  • School functions – If you’re still in pharmacy school, take advantage of all the student resources on campus. Attend job fairs, interview your professors, and join clubs that can help you network with pharmacists or pharmacy technicians.
  • Pharmacist conferences – Conferences are a key networking tool, because you can select ones specific to your industry. And, you can attend panels, workshops, or individual sessions to expand your knowledge and your network.

Networking Tips for Pharmacists

Networking comes easier to some than others, but it’s still a skill that anyone can master with practice. Here are some tips to help take the edge off of any professional interactions you might have in your networking journey.

  • Learn to actively listen. Making eye contact, nodding your head, and even repeating phrases back to another person lets them know that you are fully engaged in the conversation.
  • Practice your elevator pitch. Whether you’re trying to stand out to an employer or just want to effectively introduce yourself to another medical professional, you need a strong elevator pitch with personal and professional information.
  • Dress professionally. If you want to effectively extend your network of professionals, dress like a professional. Wear neutral colors, groom your hair, and put some extra overall effort into your appearance.
  • Ask questions. To use networking to your advantage, ask employers what they look for in pharmacist applicants. Likewise, when networking with other pharmacists, ask them any questions you have about their career that can help yours.
  • Keep in contact. Email and LinkedIn are professional ways to stay in touch with your connections. After an event, draft an email or send a message reminding them where you met and some key points you talked about.

Start Building Your Pharmacy Network

If you want more networking advice to enhance your professional network, partner with the healthcare networking professionals at HealthCare Support. We’ll work to optimize your resume, improve your elevator pitch, and elevate your professional communication. For more information on our talent network services, call 888-219-6285.

A Day in the Life of a Registered Nurse

The amount of variation between each shift as a registered nurse is incredible. New patients, new treatments, and new technologies dominate the ever-changing schedule of an RN; however, many of these nurses actually follow a similar pattern of tasks across the board. For anyone interested in taking on the role of registered nurse, here’s a peek into what your day might look like.

Communicate with Other Staff

When a nurse first clocks in to his or her shift, the previous nursing shift often gives a briefing on any important patient activities or incidents that might affect their treatment going forward. Then, the nurse will typically review the patient schedules for their shift, evaluate treatment plans for the day, and schedule any doctor’s visits or time slots for equipment usage. To wrap up the start of their shift, the nurse may check their work emails to see if there’s anything in their inbox that needs priority.

Make Patient Rounds

Once a nurse has settled into their shift, they’ll typically head out to make the first patient rounds of the day. This includes communicating with patients, actively listening to their needs, taking vitals, and recording everything in the patient chart. Patient rounds are also an important window for med passes, or the scheduled time to deliver medications to each patient. Depending on whether a nurse is working a morning or night shift, they may need to assist patients with their morning meal.

Take a Lunch Break

Lunch breaks aren’t a guarantee for registered nurses. They can certainly dedicate time to stepping away to reenergize with a meal, but medical emergencies always take priority. So, if any unexpected changes happen over a nurse’s lunch, they’ll have to address the situation and make time for meals at another point in the shift. Many nurses bring quick and simple snacks, like granola or protein bars, so they can take bites on the go.

Finish the Day

Wrapping up a nursing shift is similar to starting one. At the end of their workday, nurses often conduct their final patient rounds to check on any last-minute needs, conduct final med passes, and assist patients with their final meals if the shift ends around dinnertime. Typically, they’ll then brief the incoming nurses that will take over for the next shift and check over patient charts to make sure that every document is in order. The next shift can then fully relieve the nurse to head home and catch up on some well-earned rest.

Becoming a Registered Nurse

The role of a registered nurse is one of the most fulfilling ones on the job market. If you’re interested in taking on this challenging and rewarding career, partner with a healthcare recruiter that can pair you with the right facility. At HealthCare Support, we strive to place RN’s in the setting they’ll thrive in most, which is why we dedicate our days to understanding our talent force members and our partnering healthcare providers. If you would like more information or are interested in joining our growing talent force, call 888-219-6285.

Mindfulness at Work

You may read this title and immediately think of monks or yoga poses, however mindfulness at work doesn’t need to involve either to decrease your stress level!  The main principal of mindfulness is being consciously present, that is being aware of what is going on around you and within you. Tips on exploring mindfulness are abundant and said to increase productivity, decrease stress and help take back control of your emotions. We’ve listed the basics, and our favorites below.

Press Pause

Give yourself time to live in the moment. Pause before heading into the office each morning and regularly throughout the day even if it’s for 4 slow deep breaths. This, along with different types of mindful exercises help rebalance the nervous system and encourage rational decisions over rash reactions.

Aim for Conscious Awareness

Practice being present in what you are doing, while you are doing it. It’s not uncommon to get distracted at work, but when your mind begins to wander, acknowledge it and bring your thoughts back to the project at hand.

Active Listening

Hearing, but not really listening… We’ve all been there! Also coined inactive listening, tends to happen when we are not in the moment, distracted by thoughts outside of the conversation or stressors unrelated to the topic. We often don’t realize this is happening until it’s too late. You’ve been asked a question or it’s your turn to talk and you’re clueless. To dodge these types of awkward scenarios, stay engaged by asking questions, providing feedback or even jotting down notes, if appropriate.

These small changes in mindfulness and therefore attitude can literally add years to your life and improve your productivity and achievements in the workplace.

5 Phrases You May Be Using Incorrectly

It’s no secret that proper grammar should be used in the workplace. Good grammar not only makes you appear more professional, but it also ensures your ideas and messages are conveyed with clarity. Poor grammar can do just the opposite and lead others to make assumptions on your intelligence. A common way business professionals are dropping the grammar ball is with using incorrect idioms and phrases. Here are 5 that even prominent celebs are screwing up.

For all intensive purposes vs. For all intents and purposes

Originating from English law in the early 1500s the correct phrase, “for all intents and purposes” was used to say “officially” or “effectively.”

Shoe-in vs. Shoo-in

Most don’t have a clue they are using this wrong and imagine a shoe crossing the threshold of a door, opening a new opportunity. While the meaning is somewhat accurate the correct phrase is “shoo-in.” Just as you would shoo a bug out of your car window, to shoo means to move something with urgency.

I could care less vs. I couldn’t care less

If you really think this one through you can catch the double negative which has most people saying it wrong. The correct phrase, “I couldn’t care less” says there is no less caring you could possibly do, that is how little you care. Those who say “I could care less” are simply saying its of some importance to them and it is possible for them to care less about it.

Nip in the butt vs. Nip in the bud

A common phrase heard within management when a problem has occurred is, “nip in the bud,” however some have started using “nip in the butt.” While the latter is rather funny, the first is correct. “Nip in the bud” refers to a flower’s bud and cutting the issues straight at the source.

Down the pipe vs. Down the pike

Around here, we ask our clients if there’s any work coming “down the pike” as in turnpike and meaning in the future. This phrase is commonly mistaken for “down the pipe” which is understood given another commonly used phrase, “in the pipeline.”

Incorporating phrases or idioms into your day to day speech may make you feel more polished in the workplace, but you’ll want to make sure you are using them correctly so you’re not the butt of the joke.